Honey Fights for Rights: Grade School Survivors Share Their Truths

This Fall, Honey went “back to school” to explore the missing links within sex education and to share information about consent and healthy relationships (check out our Instagram stories for a recap). Once the school year was in full swing, we dove deeper into issues faced by students impacted by sexual assault. In December we launched Honey’s Winter Victims Rights Act campaign, which was centered on supporting victim’s rights laws that protect survivors who are forced to attend school with perpetrators.

For many survivors who have been assaulted by a peer with whom they attend school, the weight of post-traumatic stress that follows their experience is often overlooked or neglected. In many cases, the judicial system and other surrounding entities fail to prioritize their wellbeing and safety. Amid the already challenging dynamics of middle and high school, juvenile assault survivors carry the additional burden of being forced to attend school alongside the perpetrator, making it that much more difficult to heal. In many instances, survivors change schools in order to avoid their perpetrator, leaving behind the comfort of friends, academic activities, and routine while their perpetrator carries on without repercussions.


We asked survivors of sexual assault and abuse who experienced trauma between grades K-12 to share their experiences to help contribute to real change in our judicial systems. At Honey, we firmly believe in and stand up for a survivor’s right to equity, respect, dignity, and freedom from intimidation and harassment. Collecting Truths that speak to this experience have the power to establish meaningful dialogue around the issue and form preventative measures to ensure others will not have to endure the same. Whether or not the survivor was able to report their assault at the time, their experience matters.


For two weeks, we posted a series of questions on our Instagram relating to the challenges survivors face in attending school with perpetrators. Truths that speak to this experience have the power to establish meaningful dialogue around the issue and form preventative measures to ensure others will not have to endure the same. Thanks to an influx of stories from grade school survivors, we're currently in the process of posting their experiences on our Truths page here.